Carey Lewis Devotions
Friday, December 21st, 2012
Fifteen Minutes Of Fame (Part 1)
Opening The Dragon's Mouth
But I fear, lest somehow, as the serpent deceived Eve by his craftiness, so your minds may be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ.
2 Corinthians 11:3 (NKJV)
You once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience.
Ephesians 2:2 (NKJV)
He laid hold of the dragon, that serpent of old, who is the Devil and Satan, and bound him for a thousand years.
Revelation 20:2 (NKJV)
One thousand years of peace is coming soon to every theater on earth, but it hasn't opened yet.

In the 'mean time,' we face the enemy. He's playing everywhere.

If the enemy is 'The dragon, that serpent of old, who is the Devil and Satan,' if he is 'The prince of the power of the air' of media, then 'fifteen minutes of fame' is like standing in the mouth of the dragon.

This isn't a story like 'Jonah and the Whale.' It's a nightmare called 'Children and the Beast.' God is our Perfect Father. He's trying to wake us up.

The phrase 'fifteen minutes of fame' was coined by Andy Warhol, a cultural icon of the 1960s. He heralded media's rise and predicted, 'In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes.'

Consider a UCLA study published in 2011:

'Fame is the No. 1 value emphasized by television shows popular with 9 to 11 year-olds, a dramatic change over the past 10 years, UCLA psychologists report in a new study... On a list of 16 values, fame jumped from the 15th spot, where it was in both 1987 and 1997, to the first spot in 2007... The top five values in 2007 were fame, achievement, popularity, image and financial success. In 1997, the top five were community feeling, benevolence (being kind and helping others), image, tradition and self-acceptance.'

''The rise of fame in preteen television may be one influence in the documented rise of narcissism in our culture,' said the study's senior author, Patricia M. Greenfield, a UCLA distinguished professor of psychology and director of the Children's Digital Media Center @ Los Angeles. 'Popular television shows are part of the environment that causes the increased narcissism, but they also reflect the culture. They both reflect it and serve as a powerful socialization force for the next generation.' '

To Be Continued...

Link: UCLA Newsroom, http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/popular-tv-shows-teach-children-210119.aspx

P.S. To read the other devotions in this series, please see the Fifteen Minutes Of Fame series.


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