Carey Lewis Devotions
Wednesday, April 9th, 2014
Public Relations (Part 9)
A Model's Basic Stance
Then David said to all the assembly, 'Now bless the Lord your God.' So all the assembly blessed the Lord God of their fathers, and bowed their heads and prostrated themselves before the Lord and the king.
1 Chronicles 29:20 (NKJV)
Thus I will bless You while I live; I will lift up my hands in Your Name.
Matthew 26:39 (NKJV)
Abram 'Fell on his face, and God talked with him' (Genesis 17:3). 'Moses and Aaron went from the presence of the assembly to the door of the tabernacle of meeting, and they fell on their faces' (Numbers 20:6). 'Joshua fell on his face to the earth and worshiped' (Joshua 5:14).

'David lifted his eyes and saw the angel of the Lord standing between earth and heaven, having in his hand a drawn sword stretched out over Jerusalem. So David and the elders, clothed in sackcloth, fell on their faces' (1 Chronicles 21:16).

'When Solomon had finished praying all this prayer and supplication to the Lord, that he arose from before the altar of the Lord, from kneeling on his knees with his hands spread up to Heaven' (1 Kings 8:54).

'Jehoshaphat bowed his head with his face to the ground, and all Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem bowed before the Lord, worshiping the Lord' (2 Chronicles 20:18). Daniel 'Knelt down on his knees three times that day, and prayed and gave thanks before his God, as was his custom since early days' (Daniel 6:10).

Privately and publicly, the basic stance of a model for Christ isn't standing at all. It's face down and hands spread in surrender and supplication. A secondary position is kneeling. In both cases the head is lowered. An alternate praise position is with lifted hands: the hopeful reach of a child to His loving Father.

Actors, models and talent for Christ, you need practice the model's basic stance for stage, film and castings. It's helpful. But even more, you need to practice the Christian's basic stance for prayer, praise and power. If you forget the latter, the former doesn't matter anyway.

Contrary to popular opinion, it's not about your exaltation, but about your prostration. It's not about your strength, but your weakness. It doesn't say, 'Look at me.' Instead it says 'Look at Him.' Because 'Look at Him' might be a three-word summary of your job description.

To Be Continued...

P.S. To read the other devotions in this series, please see the Public Relations series.


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